01_17_2020_blog

Market Commentary 1/17/20

U.S. equities charged higher spurred on by low-interest rates, solid consumer sentiment, low unemployment, good corporate earnings, and the signing of the U.S.- China phase 1 trade deal. With the Dow likely headed to 30,000 and home builders accelerating construction starts, it appears the spring buying season should be favorable. Consumers feel flush as retirement plans swell and wages also move higher. All of this is positive for this year’s new and existing home sales. Keep an eye on prices. With such tight supply, we hope sellers don’t price new buyers out of the market given the strong consumer sentiment we are seeing.

The U.S. economy continues to be the best house on the block and with the Fed holding steady on its accommodative monetary policies we expect this Goldilocks environment to carry on for the near term. The presidential election could create volatility, but that won’t come in to play until the back half of the year. Interest rates remain attractive as the developed world is awash in low or negative-yielding debt, which has helped keep our own interest rates capped back home. However, inflation, which has been non-existent for the last decade, is showing signs of reviving. Should inflation move past Fed targets, we could see bond yields move higher and quickly. For now, most strategists have the 10-year Treasury yield pegged between 1.900 – 2.500%.

With that in mind, we continue to advise locking-in interest rates at these levels. It is a call we have been making for quite some time, but given the abundance of positive information hitting the markets, and the fact that the market has shrugged off negative-market-moving news so quickly, our feeling is interest rates have a greater chance of moving higher than lower.  One interesting point: a study was recently completed that showed that negative interest rates have done little to boost economic activity in Europe and Japan. While I am not an economist, I have always thought that lending one dollar to get back less than the principal does not make much sense.

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