Mar-21-blog

Market Commentary 3/22/19

The highly anticipated Fed meeting this past Wednesday did not disappoint.  The Fed went “max dovish” in their policy statement by stating no more rate hikes for 2019 and possibly only one rate hike in 2020. Many market watchers actually believe the next Fed move in interest rate policy will be lower, a far cry from just this past December where the Fed believed that two more rate hikes were likely for 2019.  Less understood but equally important was the Fed’s timeline on the end of the balance sheet run-off, which will be ending later in the year.

Bonds responded as expected as both government and mortgage bond yields fell precipitously.  Stocks responded with caution, falling Wednesday, rallying Thursday, and as of the time of this post, falling hard on Friday.

What’s next?  The big question being asked is what does the Fed see that others don’t with such a quick shift in policy.  Low rates will help borrowers buy new homes, cars, refinance debt, and also aid corporations, but the return of low rates due to the fear of either a brewing U.S. recession or quickly slowing European, Japanese, and the Chinese economies is quite worrisome.  Longer-dated German bunds have gone negative for the first time in quite a while, and our own 10-year U.S. Treasury bond is trading at 2.45%, well below the 3.25% seen just a couple of months ago.

For those who qualify, low rates are another bite at the apple, which will help boost the spring buying season, as well as spur refinances, which will result in more savings or more disposable cash flow to buy other items, so in that sense we are grateful to the Fed.

Should the U.S. avoid recession (keep an eye on the flattening yield curve), rates at today’s levels are very attractive, but should the U.S. slip into a recession, expect rates to fall lower.  At the moment, we are in a wait-and-see mode on rate direction and would not be surprised if rates were headed lower.

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