Market Commentary 4/29/22, Market Commentary 4/29/22

Market Commentary 4/29/22

GDP Slows As Fed Eyes Rate Hikes

It’s becoming clear to everyone that the Fed failed to act sooner. There is now a 50% -50% chance of a .75 bp Fed hike next week, in addition to the many other indicators that are turning negative on the U.S. economy.  Stagflation is now being talked about as a real threat (stagflation is the combination of slow growth and rising prices). The employment picture remains tight which supports the “no recession” argument, but this time may still be different. The combination of the geopolitical issues in Europe, global inflation, rising energy costs, a zero-Covid policy in China, and general overall unease, may produce a recession quicker than many analysts believe. Big tech names such as Apple and Amazon reported worse than expected earnings and warned of tougher times ahead due to supply chain disruption and margin declines due to inflation. While the major indexes are down from 12% to 23%, many stocks are down 50% or more. Speculation is being sucked out of the equity markets which will affect how investors look at all types of assets: private equity, real estate, and bonds. The risk premium is increasing on investments as both equity and bond markets get hammered. Remember the human psychological component of investing, when every investor runs for the exit, the price is whatever you can get and not what that asset is worth. Watch the VIX index this week, also known as the fear gauge, to blow out as a sign that near-term market capitulation is finally over.

Personal savings is going in the wrong direction as inflation outpaces gains in income.  This speaks to the heart of the issue and why I believe the Fed will let the equity market fall much further than some pundits believe. Why, you ask?  The bottom 40% of the U.S. workforce cannot handle double-digit inflation. The combination of zero interest rates and too much stimulus has now created a massive demand shock, too much money chasing too few goods. While raising interest rates will not solve this issue overnight, the downside volatility in equities will discourage consumers and businesses from spending money. This should quell inflation over time.  The Fed will come to the equity markets rescue at some point (if need be). However, we are a long way away from that conversation. 

The yield curve remains on recession watch as the 2-10 and 5-10 year U.S. Treasuries are flat. This is beginning to affect lending rates across all product offerings since ARM’s vs. Fixed rates are also pricing at nearly the same note rate.  With mortgage rates on the rise, and affordability becoming stretched due to higher interest rates, the housing market appears to have peaked. Unlike 2008, loan underwriting remains robust, so while there could be a drift down in home values, it is hard to see an outright correction on the horizon. There are also many potential homebuyers who gave up the last year and a half on buying a home, who may re-enter the housing market should prices correct slightly. The refinance market is drying up as ultra-low interest rates have pulled forward demand and so many mortgages were written with sub 3.00% debt. As stated previously, caution is warranted as the return of capital becomes more important than the return on capital.

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These are the opinions of the author. For financial advice, please talk to your CPA or financial professional.