Feb-23-blog

Market Commentary 2/15/19

U.S. equities traded well again this week in response to positive headlines that China and the U.S. will continue to negotiate tariffs, as well as the anticipation of an agreement on a new spending bill which will be signed today, and tame inflation readings. Even with some concerns about slowing global earnings growth, the threat of a global slowdown and or recession, and a poor reading of domestic retail sales for the fourth quarter, for the moment equities continue to push these worries aside. We think a lot of the excitement about equities has to do with the Fed’s pause in both rate hikes and balance sheet reduction. Risk on trading is now in full effect as market participation works under the assumption short-term interest rates will remain low both domestically and abroad. Home buyers are returning to the marketplace enticed by low interest rates and price declines. By all accounts, the U.S. economy is robust as mortgage applications rebound and consumers continue to feel good about their future prospects. With bonds, too much good news is bad, and we continue to feel compelled to advise clients that with the 10-year Treasury under 2.700%, we believe locking-in is advisable.

Feb-8-blog

Market Commentary 2/8/19

Global yields continue to move lower benefitting borrowers in a significant way.  Domestically, the so-called “Powell Put” has helped equities rise as traders have greater confidence in bidding on riskier investments.

The 10-year Treasury is trading under 2.65% which is making mortgage rates ultra attractive again and from what we can see, increased loan volume greatly.  While our domestic rates are low, rates are even lower across the pond. In fact, there are hints that the European Central Bank might soon lower short rates in the face of a slowing European economy, Brexit confusion, and looming Italian debt concerns.  Add a deflationary Japan and a slowing China economy to the mix, and therein lies the reason our domestic rates while low are actually quite high in relation to the rest of the developed world.

No big economic news this week, but next week will be important with multiple inflation reports coming out.  If inflation remains tame, we could see rates move lower.  Should we get a surprise higher on inflation, rates will adjust quickly.  The Fed calmed markets late last month as they confirmed rates increases and the Fed balance sheet reduction was not on auto-pilot. A hot inflation reading could challenge those statements, especially with a booming U.S. economy, and historically low unemployment.

Home buyers are taking advantage of these low rates, and with a drop in home prices, we are seeing greater activity from buyers.  We remain biased toward locking-in rates at these low levels (to be fair, levels we thought we would not revisit again for quite some time).

Market Commentary 1/25/19

Market Commentary 1/25/19

Government, investment grade, and mortgage rates remain low amidst uncertainty over the government shutdown, China trade negotiations, the Brexit outcome, and overall concern about a slowing global economy.   As stated previously, Wall Street likes gridlock so it is no surprise to see U.S. equities rise in the face of a government shut down.  Furthermore, the Fed has been fairly clear that we may be closer to the neutral rate of interest than previously thought, as well as slowing the reduction of the balance sheet which has been draining liquidity out of the financial system. These measures have served as a boon to equities.

Low rates have helped mortgage applications. Home sales have slowed which has forced some re-pricing that has benefited many who have waited for a break in the upward trend in housing prices.

With interest rates on the 10-year Treasury note under 2.800%, we remain cautious and are biased toward locking in interest rates at these levels.  Should the government open and should we see more positive discussions on the China trade negotiations, we believe rates may move higher and possibly, very quickly.

Jan-18-blog 2019

Market Commentary 1/18/19

The effects of the partial government shutdown

Interest rates are drifting higher as the damage caused by last month’s brutal volatility washes out and the focus returns back to earnings, the economy, global trade, and inflation.  

We will learn more about earnings in the coming weeks, but it has been a mixed bag so far. With respect to the economy, the U.S. economy remains strong, but across the pond, Europe’s economy appears to be slowing along with China. The global economic slowdown is a big concern and is partly responsible for the drop in interest rates that took hold late last year and continued into 2019. Counteractively, a slowing economy could be good for stocks as it will keep the Fed from raising rates.  

Secondly, the effects of the government shutdown (if it continues), will become a drag on future confidence readings and overall GDP if it’s not resolved soon. However, keep in mind, Wall Street loves political gridlock and the surge in the stock market is evidence of this.

Thirdly, there are rumors that the U.S. and China are working together on a trade deal. Stocks are higher on this news and bonds have sold off a touch as the risk of an all-out trade war subside.

Finally, inflation remains in check even with full employment here in the U.S. This is a big positive for bond yields along with the Fed clearly stating their intention to remain patient.  

With the recent upward trend in stocks, and, the 10-year Treasury Bond trading below 2.80% yield, we remain biased toward locking-in interest rates given recent events.   

Dec-28-blog

Market Commentary 12/28/18

After a gloomy start to the week, U.S. equities rallied significantly to the delight of traders and investors. While the equity markets are poised to close lower for the year, a strong rally on the day after Christmas stock rally and a follow up positive close took some risk off the table with respect to if “Mr. Market knew something the rest of us didn’t”. Part of the recent volatility can be attributed to year-end tax selling, but the violent moves appear to be the result computer-driven algorithmic trading. Volatility is usually a benefit to bonds, and given the strong economic data and low unemployment rates throughout the year, we are glad to report the 10-year Treasury is well under 2.82%. Around the developed world, interest rates remain accommodative as both China’s and Europe’s economy show signs of slowing. Whether or not a recession is on the horizon is debatable, but low rates appear to be needed to keep the global economy moving forward.

With inflation in check, a volatile stock market, the threat of ongoing trade tensions with China, as well as a partial government shutdown, we see interest rates remaining low for the first few months of the year. This reprieve in interest rates should be a boon for home buyers who were worried about rising interest rates and a slowing housing market. Banks are fighting hard for home loans and we look forward to helping our borrowers and referral partners in the coming year find the best loan they can.

Market Commentary – 6/26/15

Greece remains heavy on the minds of the global financial markets with no agreement as of Friday morning. There are rumors of a potential bridge loan being discussed, which would kick the can down the road a few months allowing more time for Greece and the EU to come to terms on Greece’s huge debt burden.

In the U.S., inflation remains mild. The personal consumption price index, the Federal Reserve’s preferred measure of inflation, rose .3% from April, which is the biggest rise in almost 2 years. If inflationary pressure build, this will be troubling for bonds.

Global bond yields continue to edge higher for many reasons. Here in the U.S., bonds were in the red Friday morning with the 10 year U.S. Treasury yield hovering around 2.48%.

With technical support levels broken, we are biased toward locking in loans.